Category Archives: genocide

Armenians all over the world marked the 95th anniversary of Armenian Genocide

The country and Armenians worldwide marked on Saturday (April 24th) the 95th anniversary of Armenian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire.

You can find pictures from Australia to Argentina rallies here.

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Mussolini and Armenia Genocide

Mussolini’s mistress, Clara Petacci, recorded intimate details of her affair with Il Duce in her journal. Her newly published diary reveals Mussolini as a sex-addicted anti-Semite who found Hitler “very likeable” — and who occasionally suffered from impotence.

Petacci’s recollections are of special interest to Armenians, because of this quote below:

Mussolini, while flipping through French newspapers, suddenly got into a bad mood. “These disgusting Jews, they should all be destroyed,” he said. “I will create a bloodbath the way the Turks once did. I will isolate them and imprison them. They will come to know the steel fist of Mussolini. It is time that the Italians realize that can no longer exploited by these snakes.”

Those diaries were published for the first time last week, to the considerable consternation of one of Mussolini’s descendents. “This woman would be convicted of stalking today,” says Alessandra Mussolini, Il Duce’s granddaughter. She insists that “not a word” of what Petacci wrote about her grandfather is true. Meanwhile, some extracts from the diaries, containing also the quote above, are avaliable here.

Read full version here

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Bill Handels victim of Holocaust apologized

The Armenian National Committee-Western Region (ANC-WR), joined by community organizations and activists, met with KFI640-AM radio show host Bill Handel and station management regarding offensive comments that aired on Handel’s radio show on May 13 and 14 during a discussion between Handel and Lara Hermanson.

Acknowledging that a line had been crossed, Handel, KFI and Clear Channel management apologized to the Armenian American community. With Handel himself being a descendent of Holocaust survivors, he also made it clear that recognition of the Armenian Genocide is something he has been aware of and passionate about throughout his career and promised to continue raising awareness about the issue.

“We deeply regret the inappropriate comments that were made on Bill Handel’s show last month which deeply hurt the Armenian American community. The comments were wrong,” said Robin Bertolucci, KFI Program Director. “We take responsibility for this offense as any genocide, including the Armenian Genocide, are serious topics that should not be used as the basis for humor.” KFI issued an on-air apology on June 12. KFI also released a video apology from Hermanson and Handel.

The ANC-WR requested a meeting with KFI management to convey the community’s outrage and ask that the situation be addressed. In the meantime, the ANC-WR reached out to dozens of activists and community organizations, such as the Armenian Bar Association, eager to work together on the issue, Asbarez Daily reported

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Behaviour of the Turkish government towards its Jewish citizens during the Holocaust

Interview with Corry Guttstadt Turkey, the Jews and the Holocaust.
http://www.qantara.de/webcom/show_article.php/_c-478/_nr-910/i.html

Turkologist Corry Guttstadt has published a comprehensive study of the behaviour of the Turkish government towards its Jewish citizens during the Holocaust. In doing so, she has investigated a chapter of twentieth-century history that has thus far been all but neglected by international Holocaust research. Sonja Galler spoke to her about her findings

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Much is made of the fact that there are approximately 20,000 Jews in Turkey today, a figure that is frequently held up as evidence of the country’s tolerant attitude towards its Jewish minority. It is often claimed that this success story began when persecuted Sephardic Jews found refuge in the Ottoman Empire, the forerunner of the modern Turkish state …

Corry Guttstadt: Well, there are currently over 20,000 Jews in Iran too. A number alone is not necessarily a reliable indication of whether somewhere is safe or free from anti-Semitism. As far as Turkey is concerned, it is important to emphasise that only 20,000 Jews now live in the country. That’s in stark contrast to the estimated 120,000 to 150,000 that lived in the region at the end of the First World War. Both before and after the Second World War, and most particularly after the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948, the vast majority of Jews left Turkey. This was a reversal of the trend of previous centuries.

Over the course of many centuries, the Ottoman Empire was an immigration destination for Jews fleeing the Reconquista in Spain and pogroms in Eastern Europe. Nevertheless, to portray the Ottoman Empire as a “multicultural paradise” is absurd and ahistorical. As non-Muslims, the Jews were subject to countless constraints. Like the Christians, they had to pay a poll tax and were obliged to behave in a submissive manner towards Muslims. Moreover, it must be said that there were numerous fluctuations in the fortunes of the Jews in the 600-year history of the Ottoman Empire.

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Mikel Housep Martirossian -The mission of Dhaka’s last Armenian

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Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital, was once home to thousands of migrants from the former Soviet republic who grew to dominate the city’s trade and business life.

But Martin, aged in his 70s, is now the only one left.

“When I die, maybe one of my three daughters will fly in from Canada to keep our presence here alive,” Martin said hopefully, speaking broken Bengali with a thick accent. “Or perhaps other Armenians will come from somewhere else.”

Martin came to Dhaka in 1942 during World War II, following in the footsteps of his father who had settled in the region decades earlier.

They joined an Armenian community in Bangladesh dating back to the 16th century, but now Martin worries about who will look after the large Armenian church in the city’s old quarter.

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Hawaii became the 42nd U.S. state to recognize the Armenian Genocide

HR192 H.D.1
House of Representatives
Twenty-fifth Legislature, 2009
State of Hawaii

House Resolution

Declaring April 24 as a Day of Remembrance in Recognition and Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915

WHEREAS, during the chaos of World War I between the years of 1915-1923, approximately 1,500,000 Armenian men, women, and children living within the Ottoman Empire’s borders were killed in a brutal genocide; and

WHEREAS, hundreds of thousands of Armenians were forced to flee to foreign countries after being stripped of their possessions, national identities, and homeland; and

WHEREAS, documented as the first instance of genocide in the 20th century, the Armenian genocide remains unacknowledged by the Republic of Turkey to this day; and

WHEREAS, even though over 90 years have passed since these mass killings took place, present-day atrocities continue to resonate throughout the world; and

WHEREAS, it is every person’s responsibility to recognize the brutal slayings of so many innocents, remember their suffering, and vow to help prevent future occurrences of genocide; and

WHEREAS, Armenia’s ties to Hawaii started in the 1920s with the gifted painter Arman T. Manookian, a genocide survivor, who lived in Hawaii for almost six years before his tragic death in 1931, and who became known as Hawaii’s Van Gogh; and

WHEREAS, Hawaii has a growing Armenian-American community that is involved in all aspects of public life, including business, education, and government; and

WHEREAS, each year, Armenians throughout the world honor those who perished in the first genocide of the 20th century, and all the people of the world should join in recognizing and commemorating the Armenian genocide to ensure that this ugly testament to man’s inhumanity to man is never forgotten; now, therefore,

BE IT RESOLVED by the House of Representatives of the Twenty-fifth Legislature of the State of Hawaii, Regular Session of 2009, that this body hereby declares April 24 as a day of remembrance in recognition and commemoration of the Armenian genocide; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this body joins with Hawaii’s Armenian- American community and all Armenians worldwide in recognizing and honoring those who were killed and persecuted during the Armenian genocide, and urging people throughout the world to never forget these horrific crimes against humanity; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that certified copies of this Resolution be transmitted to the Governor, who in turn is requested to transmit copies to the Executive Director of the Armenian National Committee of America and Armenian National Committee of Hawaii

http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2009/lists/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HR&billnumber=192

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Hayk Demoyan:Opening of Armenian-Turkish border is no longer considered a manna from heaven for Armenia.

We have all preconditions necessary for establishment of diplomatic relations with Ankara, Armenian Genocide Museum Director Hayk Demoyan told a news conference in Yerevan. “If Turkey refuses to establish diplomatic ties with Armenia, international community will take it as reluctance to be on friendly terms with their neighbors,” Demoyan noted. When questioned about the possibility of Turkish Armenian border opening, the Museum Director stressed that even if Ankara does not open borders, Turkey will sign some document on a possibility to open it.

“Opening borders have both positive and negative aspects for Armenia. We have to carefully analyze the challenges not to fall into dependence on Turkey. We mustn’t forget that Turkey is a country that has several scenario developments up their sleeve,” Demoyan said adding that Turkey remains the chief ally for Azerbaijan, the country waging undeclared war with Armenia.

“In financial crisis circumstances eastern provinces of Turkey became very vulnerable, the population in those regions also expects the opening of borders. Opening of Armenian-Turkish border is no longer considered a manna from heaven for Armenia. Those times are gone,” Demoyan stressed.

panarmenian.net

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